Since the start of Cotton made in Africa in 2005, the initiative has significantly expanded its network of partners who work with smallholder cotton farmers according to the CmiA Standard criteria. During the year 2018, two new partners have joined CmiA, and three more candidates already have successfully passed the verification missions and are about to finalize administrative requirements to formally become CmiA partners. The resulting extension of CmiA’s network in Zambia, Mozambique, Côte d’Ivoire and Nigeria further strengthens the sustainable cotton sector across Africa.


In early 2018, SOFITEX in Burkina Faso was the first new partner to successfully pass the initial verification cycle on both gin and field level. The cotton company is one of the largest in Africa, with more than 267.000 farmers producing seed cotton and a fibre output of ca. 119.000 metric tons in the 2017/18 season.

Later this year, Highlands Cotton Trading (HCT) in Zambia has joined the CmiA family. HCT is a new company founded by Parrogate after having taken over cotton operations from Cargill in Zambia, which had been a long-time partner. As Parrogate itself is also a CmiA partner through its company Continental Ginnery Limited (CGL), a partnership with CmiA was intended from the very beginning. The Parrogate companies together cover approximately one third of the Zambian cotton market.

In addition to SOFITEX and HCT, three more candidates are nearing completion of the verification cycles and only few administrative requirements remain to be met for them to become new CmiA partners. As a result, CmiA will be represented by a higher number of partners in Mozambique and Côte d’Ivoire. With one new partner in Nigeria, CmiA will also increase the number of countries where the sustainable cotton standard is being implemented.

An overview of certified cotton companies can be found here.

CmiA annually updates aggregated numbers of farmers, area under cotton cultivation as well as seed cotton and fibre production in its factsheet which you can find here.

CmiA Partner Alliance Tanzania has a strong relationship with its cotton growing communities and is very committed to improving living conditions in the rural areas. Having constructed a Maternity Ward and provided several boreholes and water storage systems, the cotton company focused on the improvement of school infrastructure in 2018. Within less than one year, the company has built 11 new classrooms, 21 latrines and one girls dormitory for a secondary school and thereby improved learning conditions for more than 500 pupils in the region. The project was even honoured by the Tanzanian government through a visit of the annual Uhuru Torch race.

The Simiyu region in Northern Tanzania has a constantly growing young population, with almost one million inhabitants aged under 19. After the Tanzanian Government decided on free primary and secondary school education in 2015, the school enrolment rates have significantly increased. Although this is a great step towards widespread literacy within the society, the necessary school infrastructure does not yet meet the requirements of many parts of the Simiyu region, which is where CmiA Partner Alliance Tanzania is based. Long walking distances for the pupils, over-crowded classrooms and inadequate learning conditions thus remain problems that could not yet be solved.

Within the framework of the CmiA Community Cooperation Programme, Alliance Tanzania realized a project that contributed to improving the schooling situation. The objective of the project was to ensure an improved learning and teaching environment at four primary and two secondary schools and to thereby increase the overall pass rates. Alliance was very dedicated to the project and in less than one year, 11 new classrooms, 21 latrines as well as one dormitory for secondary school girls were built. In total, this created better learning conditions for more than 500 pupils in the region.

The new educational infrastructure is highly appreciated by the surrounding communities. Due to the new facilities and improved conditions, lower drop-out rates and better examination results are expected.
Even the Tanzanian Government took notice of the project and honoured it by bringing the Uhuru torch to the community as a symbol of appreciation.

CmiA congratulates Alliance Tanzania on the successfully implemented project and is looking forward to future collaborations.

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[1] The Uhuru Torch (literally “Torch of Freedom”) is one of the National Symbols of Tanzania. It is a kerosene torch that symbolizes freedom and light- to symbolically shine the country and across its borders. There is an annual Uhuru Torch race which starts from different regions throughout Tanzania. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uhuru_Torch

To raise awareness for the world behind our textiles and share stories about the farmers that produce the raw material for our clothes with a wide audience of consumers, Cotton made in Africa has started the #BathrobeChallenge. It is a fun social media campaign built around the bathrobe as a strong symbol for farmers such as Juliet Kabugho.


Juliet and her husband are proud cotton farmers and parents to five children – two big tasks for both of them. Through agricultural, social and business trainings, she and her husband have learned more about sustainable and efficient cotton production. This puts them in the position to improve their working and living conditions themselves. Ever since they participated in farmer trainings, they have learnt to pull together. “When I joined the farmer training programme, my life changed”, says Juliet. She explains: “Through the gender training, my husband and I have learned about the importance of planning our farming activities together – one of the reasons our cotton yields and our income have improved. And my husband now helps me with household duties like fetching water and firewood.” Juliet has also learnt about sustainable agricultural and business methods, which have made it easier for her to efficiently cultivate her field, increase her yields, plan and budget accordingly. “We can now afford school fees, so my children are now all going to school”, she reports proudly. “And we have also learnt why Cotton made in Africa does not allow child labour and why it is so important to send our children to school.”


You want to support farmers such as Juliet? Wear your bathrobe to join the fun and raise awareness for the impact we all can have by choosing Cotton made in Africa labelled textiles! Discover more on www.bathrobechallenge.com

As the new cotton growing season is starting in Zambia, CmiA recently sent an agri-technical expert to give a series of Training of Trainers (ToT) on the vital role of extension staff and didactical methods for the officers to run impactful farmer trainings. While ToT is a typical and regular measure, this particular training series was special: for the first time, extension officers of four ginners were trained under one roof. This joint training trial was very well received, and ginners realized that a pre-competitive sharing of training content and knowledge on how to approach farmers can help the sector improve its overall performance.

Zambia is one of the countries where CmiA started its journey of enabling smallholder cotton farmers to improve their livelihoods through better farming practices. The country does not practice zoning, which means that ginners are not assigned to operate in a specific area only. Consequently, Zambian ginners work in a highly competitive environment. Interaction between ginners was so far limited to the Zambian Cotton Ginners Association (ZCGA), and - for five out of the seven members of ZCGA - through their linkage to CmiA, as they participated in workshops, stakeholder conferences and other events.

With the two-day training sessions in three locations across Zambia, a next step in collaboration amongst the ginners was now taken. On behalf of CmiA, an agri-technical expert conducted the training of 20 to 30 trainers representing each of the four ginning companies in Chipata, Katete and Mumbwa, thus reaching out to a total of 100 extension officers. The first training day focused on the vital role of extension officers concerning increasing yields across the farmers base. The second day dealt with the setting up and management of demo plots, integrated pest management and yield assessment.

The interactive sessions revealed a number of things: On the one hand, cotton companies sent quite experienced staff, as a minimum of 88% of participants in all three groups have worked in cotton for more than three years. On the other hand, a minimum of two thirds of the participants in the three groups have worked for more than one company. As a consequence, participants endorsed the joint training approach which, according to their feedback, can foster standardized messages in farmer training, knowledge sharing and relationship building between extension service staff. Participants jointly developed recommendations, and even asked that their management should take this approach to the next level by demanding authorities such as the Cotton Board of Zambia (CBZ) and/or ZCGA to require all cotton companies to present staff and farmer training policies.

AbTF thanks Dr Ben Sekamatte for his valuable training input, and Emmanuel Mbewe of Parrogate (CGL and HTC), Joseph Mwanza of NWK Agri-Services and Daniel Maseko of Grafax for taking this approach forward and organizing the training series with high efficiency.

An Impressive Example from Côte d’Ivoire

Within the framework of the CmiA Community Cooperation Programme and with support of the German fashion retailer bonprix, the cotton company COIC (Compagnie Ivoirienne de Coton) started a community project on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) back in March 2018. In a very short time, COIC was able to reach nine schools and villages and more than 2,500 people in total. The project initially had the goal to construct 21 latrines and five water pumps (boreholes), yet much more has already been achieved, even before the project has ended, including a local competition for “the cleanest village”.

The project’s first step was raising awareness amongst the population about the topic of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and ensuring ownership and long-term sustainable impact by involving the entire community in the activities as much as possible. The WASH trainings were the basis for a movement towards self-determined change. Training sessions were conducted in the local language and covered two topics: waterborne diseases, and hygiene and sanitation of people’s living environment. In total, more than 2,590 people across all age groups participated in these training courses.

The project’s second step was informing the communities about the construction of boreholes and latrines and establishing a committee that will be responsible for the facilities’ maintenance as well as water management in future.

The third step was repairing existing and constructing new boreholes and sanitary facilities. During the first months of the project, the borehole locations were determined and the first holes were drilled. All five wells have been built and so far, 12 latrines have been completed in four villages (three latrines per village). Until the end of December, nine more latrines will be built in three villages.

This project’s impact goes beyond the delivery of boreholes and latrines, as the communities involved have decided to close the year with a competition amongst themselves: They have defined a set of criteria against which they will assess “the cleanest village”. The communities have recognized that a clean village protects and respects the environment, which in turn facilitates clean water supply and healthy communities.

COIC has successfully implemented this project and especially achieved to involve the local communities from the very beginning, ensuring that their ownership yields long-term direct and indirect impact. The project has managed to reduce the spreading of preventable waterborne diseases by improving the basic supply of drinking water and providing sanitary facilities. In addition to this, it has also initiated visible changes in people’s behavior and everyday lives.

Wearing a bathrobe to raise awareness for cotton farmers in Africa? Precisely! In the face of climate crises, tons of microplastic polluting the oceans and inhuman working conditions for people in the cultivating regions of cotton, coffee, rice and other commodities, it’s easy to get frustrated and think that we as individuals cannot change this. But we can. Cotton made in Africa shows how, and in a positive way – with the #BathrobeChallenge. Because the good thing is: Everybody can do something to change the world for the better. And sometimes, doing good can be easy! How so?


With the #BathrobeChallenge, CmiA sends a clear message: Everybody who joins in by wearing a bathrobe in public is taking a stand for the more than one million African cotton farmers who collaborate with CmiA. Mary Mbambu is one of them. Through Cotton made in Africa, she and her husband Baluku have participated in farmer trainings – and learned a lot about sustainable cultivation methods and gender equality. When talking to Mary about her experiences and knowledge gained through the trainings, one thing came directly to her mind: “We share the tasks”, she reports. “When I‘m not well, Baluku cooks for the kids or attends to other tasks that traditionally rather fall to women. We also talk about how we spend our money. For me, it was for example very important to cultivate food crops, next to cotton, to provide for our family. I could carry the argument home and now we even have a small pantry for our harvest.” Breaking with traditional gender roles and learning more about gender equality has made Mary something of a role model in her community. “Other women often approach me and ask how I learned so much”, she reports. “Then I tell them that the trainings in mixed training groups help me.”


Together with its partners and friends such as OTTO, Tchibo, WWF or Welthungerhilfe, CmiA is inviting everybody to join the #BathrobeChallenge and discover the world behind our textiles. The bathrobe has been chosen as a strong symbol for this mission as it exemplifies how much cotton is used in our clothes. As a fashion item however, the bathrobe is rarely present in public – just like the faces and stories of African cotton farmers like Mary. With the #BathrobeChallenge, CmiA wants to give African cotton farmers the recognition they deserve in international trade and give a positive, recognizable "face" to a hitherto anonymous mass product - cotton. When we met Mary at her home in Western Uganda and talked about the fun social media campaign we built around the bathrobe, she wanted to be a part of it and immediately put on a bathrobe - and her amazing smile.


Through partnering with CmiA, farmers can take part in a training programme and learn about efficient and sustainable agricultural as well as business methods, gender equality and the importance of stopping child labour. These trainings make it easier for farmers to protect nature and improve their living and working conditions themselves. Consumers can easily choose to support African cotton farmers like Mary and Baluku – and not just by wearing a bathrobe and spreading the word on sustainable cotton. Products that support the initiative wear a small red Cotton made in Africa label. This makes them easy to recognise and allows consumers to opt for products that make them smile – and share this smile with farmers and nature. A wide range of brands and retailers partner with CmiA and use CmiA certified cotton in their production. For a full list of partners, click here.


Discover more about the #BathrobeChallenge at www.bathrobechallenge.com

Contact

Aid by Trade Foundation

Cotton made in Africa
Gurlittstraße 14
20099 Hamburg
Germany

info@abt-foundation.org

Tel.: +49 (0)40 - 2576 - 755 - 0

Fax: +49 (0)40 - 2576 - 755 - 11

 

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